Burundi

 

Operation: Opération: Burundi

Location

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Key Figures

2021 planning figures
142,890 Burundian returnees will receive basic assistance, including transportation assistance and core relief items
100% refugee and returnee children below one year of age will receive birth certificates by the authorities
100% of asylum-seekers and refugees will be provided with individual protection documentation
95% of refugee and returnee children will be enrolled in primary education
80% of asylum-seekers, refugees and returnees with specific needs will be assisted
20% of returnees (18-59 years) will be supported to begin businesses and become self-employed
2019 year-end results
100% coverage rate for the Prevention of Mother-To-Child Transmission of HIV/AIDS programme.
>80% of repatriated families were interviewed and benefitted from protection monitoring.
80% of refugees had access to health care.
60% of households lived in adequate dwellings.
80,000 registrations of urban and camp-based refugees were verified using the Biometric Information Management System.
12,900 camp-based children benefited from primary education, while 4,300 youths were enrolled in secondary school.
3,740 refugees were submitted for resettlement or 94% of the target of 4,000 individuals. Some 2,930 refugees departed to six resettlement countries.
>80% of repatriated families were interviewed and benefitted from protection monitoring.
80% of refugees had access to health care.
60% of households lived in adequate dwellings.

People of Concern Personnes relevant de la compétence du HCR

7%
Decrease in
2019
2019 144,791
2018 156,392
2017 195,530

 

[["Refugees",78473],["Asylum-seekers",9003],["IDPs",33256],["Returned refugees",21181],["Stateless",974],["Others of concern",1904]]
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Burundi

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2019 {"categories":[2016,2017,2018,2019,2020,2021],"budget":[34.53884162,33.81553606,33.00214314,50.92459511,56.76049354,72.47459590000001],"expenditure":[17.32505948,19.60250263,27.31731118,22.35627834,null,null]} {"categories":[2016,2017,2018,2019,2020,2021],"p1":[28.50049693,29.424409609999998,32.49367779,46.82598187,52.66187944,32.7226089],"p2":[0.92834469,0.007075,null,0.012017,0.012017,0.012017],"p3":[null,null,null,2,2,37.985751],"p4":[5.11,4.38405145,0.5084653499999999,2.08659624,2.0865971,1.754219]} {"categories":[2016,2017,2018,2019,2020,2021],"p1":[15.49302301,17.78705999,26.84660657,22.277896050000003,null,null],"p2":[0.12217789999999999,null,null,null,null,null],"p3":[null,null,null,null,null,null],"p4":[1.70985857,1.8154426399999999,0.47070460999999997,0.07838229,null,null]}
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Year-end Overview

Operational environment

In 2021, UNHCR in Burundi plans to provide protection and assistance to some 95,000 refugees and 5,000 asylum-seekers, in addition to nearly 142,890 Burundian returnees from Rwanda, the United Republic of Tanzania and other countries in the region.
 
Ongoing insecurity in the Democratic Republic of the Congo may result in additional new arrivals to Burundi, which may require the establishment of a new refugee camp, as the existing camps are full and cannot absorb additional refugees. Furthermore, the asylum policy in Burundi does not provide for out-of-camp services, with the exception of minimal support provided to urban refugees.
 
UNHCR will continue to advocate for an out-of-camp policy and the right to full freedom of movement for refugees and asylum-seekers in the country. In parallel, UNHCR will continue to advocate access to territory, respect of the principle of non-refoulement and access to basic services including health, along with other fundamental rights for refugees in Burundi.
 
Empowering refugees while pursuing a more favourable framework for local integration will also remain a priority. This will be done through innovative projects in line with the Sustainable Development Goals and in partnership with development donors’ multilateral initiatives to support refugees, returnees, host populations and IDPs.
 
Despite the relatively peaceful elections in 2020, the prevailing fragile human rights situation risks derailing the decisions of refugees from the region who were intending to return. These regional dynamics may result in a mix of push and pull factors, affecting protection and solutions for refugees.
 
Returnees will continue to be supported, and monitoring activities will continue to ensure their rights are respected and that reintegration takes place in safety and dignity. A regional approach to ensure sustainability of returns will be applied to avoid secondary displacements in and outside the country.
 
Furthermore, conditions of return to Burundi will need to be improved to ensure voluntary and sustainable returns. Reception conditions and reintegration programmes in Burundi will also need to be improved, especially in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic and their effect on the local economy.

Key priorities

Priorities for returnees in 2021 will include: 
  • Ensuring access to cash assistance and shelter for returnees upon arrival - in 2020, only 33% of returnees on average had access to adequate housing upon arrival.
  • ​Increasing school enrolment - in 2020, 52% of returnee children were out of school, exacerbating child protection concerns.
  • Strengthening access to administrative and national documentation procedures, including national identification documents upon return.
Priorities for refugees and asylum-seekers in 2021 will include:
  • Preserving the asylum space and improving the existing registration and refugee status determination procedures.
  • Preserving the civilian and humanitarian character of asylum.
  • Identifying appropriate durable solutions for refugees.
  • Advocating for freedom of movement and access to public services.
  • Supporting livelihoods and skills development.
Latest contributions
  • 06-MAY-2021
    United States of America
    $23,406,830
  • 30-APR-2021
    Malaysia

    private donors

    $349,499
  • Germany
    $8,206,331
  • Netherlands

    private donors

    $354,046
  • Philippines

    private donors

    $213,753
  • Spain

    private donors

    $7,519,717
  • France

    private donors

    $203,196
  • Republic of Korea

    private donors

    $8,065,080
  • Thailand

    private donors

    $472,998
  • United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

    private donors

    $164,149
  • Brazil

    private donors

    $195,542
  • China

    private donors

    $785,545
  • 29-APR-2021
    United Arab Emirates

    private donors

    $307,200
  • Mexico

    private donors

    $81,538
  • Greece

    private donors

    $163,939
  • Italy

    private donors

    $1,832,148
  • Canada

    private donors

    $909,217
  • France
    $51,854,424
  • 28-APR-2021
    Japan

    private donors

    $67,929
  • 27-APR-2021
    Canada

    private donors

    $100,000