Uganda

 

Operation: Opération: Uganda

Location

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Key Figures

2021 planning figures
1.4 million refugees and asylum-seekers will receive protection and assistance
100% of people of concern will be provided with individual protection documentation
100% of identified children of concern with specific needs will be assisted
100% of primary-school-aged children will be enrolled in primary school
1.5 The under-5 mortality rate will remain below 1.5 per 1,000 children
2019 year-end results
100% of refugees (1,190,900) were able to access primary health care services.
100% preventive reproductive health and HIV services were provided, against a target of 94%. Some 7,700 refugees in settlements accessed antiretroviral therapy.
73% of registered refugee and host community children were enrolled in primary school (334,400 out of a target of 457,200).
4.4 million tree seedlings were planted, out of a National Forestry Authority target of 8.4 million (52%).
4,500 incidents of sexual and gender-based violence were reported, managed and documented.
3,300 out of a target of 4,400 individuals were submitted for resettlement (74%).
0.33 was the under-five mortality rate registered against the target of less than 1.5 per population.

People of Concern Personnes relevant de la compétence du HCR

169%
Increase in
2019
2019 3,685,631
2018 1,370,923
2017 1,575,148

 

[["Refugees",1359464],["Asylum-seekers",21658],["Returned refugees",3],["Others of concern",2304506]]
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Uganda

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2019 {"categories":[2016,2017,2018,2019,2020,2021],"budget":[302.144587466,551.108264853,415.20307154,386.19999993,357.07001032,344.828],"expenditure":[125.32271148000001,204.68911788,184.59756407999998,159.58054191,null,null]} {"categories":[2016,2017,2018,2019,2020,2021],"p1":[302.03654321600004,550.908264853,415.00307154,385.99999993,356.67001032,344.334721],"p2":[0.10804425,0.2,0.2,0.2,0.4,0.493279],"p3":[null,null,null,null,null,null],"p4":[null,null,null,null,null,null]} {"categories":[2016,2017,2018,2019,2020,2021],"p1":[125.31882094,204.67148963999998,184.54791916,159.51147375,null,null],"p2":[0.00389054,0.01762824,0.049644919999999995,0.06906816,null,null],"p3":[null,null,null,null,null,null],"p4":[null,null,null,null,null,null]}
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Year-end Overview

Plan Overview

Operational environment

The refugee population in Uganda is estimated to reach 1,484,356 by the end of 2021. While the Ugandan borders have been officially closed for asylum since March 2020 to reduce the spread of COVID-19, there have been several instances of groups of asylum-seekers admitted and it is expected that new refugee arrivals will continue to cross into Uganda through unofficial crossing points, fleeing political instability, violence and declining economies in neighboring countries, including the Democratic Republic of the Congo, South Sudan and Burundi.
 
UNHCR will continue to advocate with the Government of Uganda to re-open the borders; however, it is likely that the situation will remain unchanged until Uganda has adequate capacity to quarantine and test large numbers of asylum-seekers for COVID-19.
 
Due to insufficient funding, food rations for refugees have been reduced by 30% since April 2020 and are likely to be cut further in 2021. In the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, additional food ration reductions are likely to further affect the well-being of refugees in Uganda, as well as their protection status and access to livelihoods. The incidence of high-risk coping mechanisms reported in 2020 are likely to remain high in 2021, including child marriage and pregnancy, transactional sex and theft. Incidents of gender-based violence and suicides will also likely remain a serious concern in 2021.
 
Uganda is expected to continue implementing progressive refugee policies for asylum-seekers and refugees residing in the country, including freedom of movement, the right to work and establish a business, and access to Government services such as education and health care.
 
Under the Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework (CRRF) in Uganda, efforts will continue to support Government refugee policies and protect the asylum space; support resilience and self-reliance of refugees and host communities; and expand solutions. As foreseen in the Global Compact on Refugees, UNHCR will continue its catalytic role in mobilizing and coordinating support for the refugee response, with a particular focus on development partners and the private sector. The humanitarian response, whose needs and priorities are captured in the 2020-2021 Uganda Refugee Response Plan (RRP), will continue to be coordinated through the Refugee Coordination Model.
 
The CRRF Secretariat will continue to support the CRRF Steering Group, which is the main multi-stakeholder policy forum and decision-making body for the CRRF in Uganda.
 
The National Development Plan (NDP III 2020/21 – 2024/25) represents the framework for the inclusion of refugees in development planning.
 
Under the World Bank IDA-18 sub-window for refugees and host communities, the Government of Uganda will continue to implement development projects in refugee-hosting districts.

Key priorities 

UNHCR’s priority outcomes in 2021 will focus on: (1) refugee protection and solutions, including mental health and psychosocial support; (2) access to quality education; and (3) improved self-reliance and resilience of refugees and the host community.
 
To pursue these priorities, UNHCR will continue to follow a two-fold approach:
 
  • Stepping back operationally, while continuing to advocate for more integration/inclusion of refugees into government service delivery systems; and increasingly handing over day-to-day operations to partners, districts and line ministries.
  • Scaling up protection leadership.
 
(1) Refugee status determination
UNHCR will continue to provide on-the-job training for Government interview officers and support the Government in reducing the refugee status determination backlog.
 
(2) Quality education
UNHCR will continue to support the implementation of the “Education response plan for refugees and host communities”, in addition to ensuring that investments made under the RRP contribute to the longer-term education response and strengthen the Governments’ education system and institutions.
 
(3) Self-reliance and livelihoods
UNHCR will build on existing skill sets in the refugee and host communities through quick impact projects, livelihoods opportunities and income-generating activities. UNHCR will also pursue more direct linkages with development projects, the private sector, districts and sub-counties to focus direct support to individuals and refugee groups.
Latest contributions
  • 28-FEB-2021
    Malaysia

    private donors

    $314,422
  • Greece

    private donors

    $146,225
  • Canada

    private donors

    $386,689
  • China

    private donors

    $952,279
  • Spain

    private donors

    $6,253,100
  • Republic of Korea

    private donors

    $8,009,396
  • Thailand

    private donors

    $482,592
  • Denmark

    private donors

    $66,194
  • 27-FEB-2021
    Italy

    private donors

    $1,909,070
  • Philippines

    private donors

    $196,427
  • 26-FEB-2021
    Japan

    private donors

    $95,999
  • 24-FEB-2021
    Republic of Korea
    $200,000
  • 19-FEB-2021
    United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

    private donors

    $472,038
  • 17-FEB-2021
    United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

    private donors

    $129,144
  • Japan
    $73,450,115
  • 16-FEB-2021
    Japan
    $3,450,000
  • 15-FEB-2021
    Czech Republic

    private donors

    $949,966
  • 14-FEB-2021
    Canada

    private donors

    $386,164
  • 12-FEB-2021
    Sweden
    $32,389,632
  • 11-FEB-2021
    United Arab Emirates

    private donors

    $155,804