Somalia

 

Operation: Opération: Somalia

Location

{"longitude":45,"latitude":6,"zoom_level":0,"iso_codes":"'SOM'"}

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Key Figures

2021 planning figures
2.6 million IDPs, 109,000 Somali returnees and 28,000 refugees and asylum-seekers will receive assistance
100% of registered refugees will have access to primary health care
90% of registered school-aged refugee children will be enrolled in primary education
80% of IDP households will receive basic and domestic items
70% of IDP women will receive sanitary supplies
64% of Somali returnee youths (aged 15-24) will be enrolled in certified livelihoods training
2019 year-end results
77,000 IDPs received emergency shelter assistance through distribution of 12,800 emergency shelter kits and 10,000 vouchers for shelter material.
250 transitional shelters and 300 permanent shelters were constructed for IDPs.
205,000 IDPs benefited from core relief items (CRIs) through distribution of 34,300 units of CRIs and 20,500 cash vouchers for CRIs.
12,400 Out of a total of 66,900 refugees and returnee children, 12,400 (19%) had access to education, including primary and secondary education.
80% of refugees had access to primary health care services.
11,100 people of concern received assistance to prevent and respond to sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) including psychosocial support, community-based protection, awareness sessions, health care access, livelihoods assistance, and legal aid.

People of Concern Personnes relevant de la compétence du HCR

2%
Decrease in
2019
2019 2,712,622
2018 2,769,028
2017 2,187,585

 

[["Refugees",17883],["Asylum-seekers",17789],["IDPs",2648000],["Returned IDPs",22555],["Returned refugees",6243],["Others of concern",152]]
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Somalia

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2019 {"categories":[2016,2017,2018,2019,2020,2021],"budget":[165.91668118,118.079818567,186.38427484000002,183.29162524,154.37925103,157.67604869],"expenditure":[50.90649389,77.0882735,64.84599844,66.67223914,null,null]} {"categories":[2016,2017,2018,2019,2020,2021],"p1":[93.41383409999999,55.025162457,79.06649112999999,34.26107633,42.8765389,48.989942899999996],"p2":[null,null,null,null,null,null],"p3":[34.862433409999994,23.49323017,58.449545969999996,112.6362472,76.66090962,74.25887333],"p4":[37.64041367,39.56142594,48.868237740000005,36.39430171,34.84180251,34.42723246]} {"categories":[2016,2017,2018,2019,2020,2021],"p1":[29.51135868,43.41707683,33.68236103,12.938005720000001,null,null],"p2":[null,null,null,null,null,null],"p3":[8.31500207,17.82340434,20.23522218,27.537035739999997,null,null],"p4":[13.080133140000001,15.84779233,10.92841523,26.19719768,null,null]}
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Year-end Overview

Operational environment 

The overall protection environment in Somalia remains challenging. Refugees and asylum-seekers face a range of protection issues, including xenophobia, risk of refoulement, arbitrary arrest and detention, sexual violence, exploitation and abuse, and discrimination regarding access to justice and already-limited basic services and livelihood opportunities. The COVID-19 pandemic has put additional pressure on an already strained situation for refugees and asylum-seekers, characterized by increasing unemployment and potential risks of eviction from housing/settlement sites.
 
Children at risk of stateless is a concern due to the gaps under the 1962 Citizenship Law, and with Somalia not a signatory to the 1954 and 1961 Statelessness Conventions.
 
In Puntland the parliament passed a Refugee Protection Act in 2017 with UNHCR’s support. However, while a draft Refugee Act is currently pending endorsement by the Somalia Parliament, there is no comprehensive and up-to-date legal framework for refugees at the federal level. Likewise in Somaliland, a draft Refugee Act is currently being developed with the support of UNHCR. Efforts to develop a number of other important federal-level legal and policy instruments in 2021 are underway, including a federal IDP law and a migrant returnee and re-admission policy, and UNHCR will continue to support these efforts.
 
Security remains a big challenge in Somalia with Al-Shabaab insurgents fighting the Somalia National Army, backed by the African Union Mission in Somalia. There are also clan-based militias fights exacerbating the security situation. With presidential elections planned in 2021, this could impact the political and security environment.
 
UNHCR in Somalia has excellent working relations with the authorities and participates in the coordination mechanisms established by the Federal Government of Somalia on the implementation of the Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework, durable solutions and the National Development Plan (NDP-9). UNHCR will continue to engage development actors to strengthen self-reliance and livelihoods programming for people of concern. Engagement with the private sector is not yet well established in Somalia, though efforts are being made in this direction.

Key priorities

In 2021 UNHCR will focus on: 
  • Improving reception conditions and refugee status determination (RSD) through greater access to registration and awareness raising on available services; implementing UNHCR’s 2020 RSD strategy with a focus on strengthening RSD systems and capacity; reducing RSD backlog; reviewing the strategic use of RSD in Somalia; and increasing the capacity of key authorities in relation to refugee protection and RSD.
  • Establishing functional protection referral mechanisms, including identification and outreach to refugee communities, aligned to UNHCR’s multi-year multi-partner protection and solutions strategy and other sub-strategies and standard operating procedures.
  • Strengthening accountability and response capacity to recurring and newly-arising emergencies, particularly in the context of internal displacement, including by ensuring people of concern have sufficient access to basic and domestic items through the provision of shelter and dignity kits and core relief item assistance; ensuring access to services for persons at heightened risk; and ensuring dignity kits, solar lights, core relief items and referral services are in place for survivors of gender-based violence.
  • Strengthening UNHCR’s response capacity to IDP situations linked to insecurity and disasters, such as floods, droughts and cyclones, etc.
  • Supporting the Government in developing legal frameworks for all population planning groups (refugees and asylum-seekers, returnees and IDPs).
  • Strengthening sustainable returns, and in particular, pursuing voluntary return for refugees and asylum-seekers in collaboration with relevant stakeholders in countries of origin, and for Somali returnees through the provision of return assistance and community-based protection activities.
  • Advocating to increase resettlement quotas for refugees in Somalia, especially non-Ethiopians and expanding admission through complimentary pathways.
  • Supporting access to livelihoods and education by increasing enrolment in primary school education and continuing to shift towards public education in line with the CRRF approach; advocating and building partnerships  to cover the gaps in secondary and university education; ensuring access to primary health care for all refugees and asylum-seekers and supporting secondary health care through referrals where needed; and scaling up livelihoods initiatives, vocational skills training and self-reliance programmes.
  • Supporting the most vulnerable households with assistance to mitigate the effects of COVID-19, and advocating for refugees and asylum-seekers inclusion for the COVID-19 vaccination programme, when available in Somalia. 
Latest contributions
  • 06-MAY-2021
    United States of America
    $23,406,830
  • 30-APR-2021
    Malaysia

    private donors

    $349,499
  • Germany
    $8,206,331
  • Netherlands

    private donors

    $354,046
  • Philippines

    private donors

    $213,753
  • Spain

    private donors

    $7,519,717
  • France

    private donors

    $203,196
  • Republic of Korea

    private donors

    $8,065,080
  • Thailand

    private donors

    $472,998
  • United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

    private donors

    $164,149
  • Brazil

    private donors

    $195,542
  • China

    private donors

    $785,545
  • 29-APR-2021
    United Arab Emirates

    private donors

    $307,200
  • Mexico

    private donors

    $81,538
  • Greece

    private donors

    $163,939
  • Italy

    private donors

    $1,832,148
  • Canada

    private donors

    $909,217
  • France
    $51,854,424
  • 28-APR-2021
    Japan

    private donors

    $67,929
  • 27-APR-2021
    Canada

    private donors

    $100,000