A teacher with young kids in a school.
© UNHCR  

| The Netherlands flag The Netherlands Making a difference, together.

The Netherlands is one of UNHCR’s most reliable partners in refugee protection and humanitarian assistance, providing invaluable financial, political, humanitarian and policy support around the world.

The Netherlands is UNHCR’s fourth largest government contributor of unearmarked funds, and the seventh largest government donor overall. Its contribution is vital to UNHCR in assisting refugees, IDPs and others in need. The Netherlands is a leading actor in humanitarian policy fora on issues related to transparency and accountability, and the humanitarian-development nexus among others.

As UNHCR’s fourth largest government contributor of unearmarked funding in 2020, the Netherlands plays an instrumental role in helping UNHCR to respond where the needs of refugees and other displaced people are the greatest. This includes allowing UNHCR to kick-start emergency responses, and fully respond to situations of protracted and neglected conflicts. The Netherlands’ support includes specific humanitarian assistance for vulnerable people, including women and girls, and aims to support the resilience of those who are forced to flee. The Netherlands and UNHCR are both strongly committed to the prevention of and response to gender-based violence, as well as a zero-tolerance approach to sexual exploitation, abuse and harassment. The Netherlands strongly supports the Global Compact on Refugees, establishing the Prospects Partnership, which is aimed at bringing development actors closer to the humanitarian response to displacement crises.

A young Syrian refugee gets help with post-traumatic stress disorder in the aftermath of the Beirut blast

Four-year-old Manar Al Kik, is getting psychological support at the Makhloufi Foundation in Beirut. The Beirut explosion in 2020 sent psychological shockwaves through the city, generating trauma within a population already affected by the recurrent conflict and political crises. With the help of unearmarked funds from the Netherlands, UNHCR’s overall response to the blast includes providing psychological support to Syrian and Lebanese victims.

Fahima Al-Daher, 35,  Syrian refugee from Aleppo, and her daughter Manar Al Kik, 4, on theri way back home after attending a psycological session at the clinic of Makhzoumi Foundation, where she is getting psychological support as a part of  UNHCR’s overall response to the Beirut blast.
Fahima Al-Daher, 35, Syrian refugee from Aleppo, and her daughter Manar Al Kik, 4, on theri way back home after attending a psycological session at the clinic of Makhzoumi Foundation, where she is getting psychological support as a part of  UNHCR’s overall response to the Beirut blast. ©UNHCR/Diego Ibarra Sánchez  

UNHCR’s cash assistance helps displaced families in Tripoli, Libya

Internally displaced Libyan woman, Hanan, receives UNHCR’s visit to assess the impact of the cash assistance programme.

More than 200,000 Libyans were displaced from their homes as a result of fighting in Tripoli that began in April 2019 and lasted more than a year. Recognizing the acute hardships many are facing, UNHCR and partners such as the Netherlands have been providing cash grants to some of the most vulnerable through prepaid cards that can be used in retail outlets.

Hanan inside her flat in a unfinished Sikke buildings, Tripoli, Libya.
Hanan inside her flat in a unfinished Sikke buildings, Tripoli, Libya. © UNHCR/Mohamed Alalem  

UNHCR’s home visits determine refugees’ eligibility for assistance in Jordan

Syrian refugee, Siham, 43, holds her grandson in her apartment in Amman, where she lives with her husband, Abdulhamid, 50, and their children and grandchildren.

Siham and Abdulhamid are among the most vulnerable families in Jordan and have been reliant on UNHCR cash assistance for four years. Thanks to the help from the Netherlands, refugees can count on cash assistance during cold winters.

Siham, 43, is pictured with her grandson at home in Amman, Jordan.
Siham, 43, is pictured with her grandson at home in Amman, Jordan. Siham and her family rely on cash assistance from UNHCR to survive. © UNHCR/Lilly Carlisle  

Newly refugees are being registered at Um Rakuba Camp in Sudan

Diana Mbabazi Kafuuma leads the UNHCR registration process of newly arrived refugees at Um Rakuba Camp in Gedaref State. With support from the Netherlands, UNHCR is collecting essential information from refugees to provide life-saving assistance.

Diana Mbabazi Kafuuma is leading UNHCR registration process of the newly arrived refugees at Um Rakuba camp in Gedaref State.
Diana Mbabazi Kafuuma is leading UNHCR registration process of the newly arrived refugees at Um Rakuba camp in Gedaref State. UNHCR is collecting information from refugees to provide lifesaving assistance. © UNHCR/Ahmed Kwarte  

Returnee Shazia is making face masks in Nangarhar, Afghanistan

20-year-old Shazia irons sheets of masks after being supported by UNHCR with a training in Nangarhar province.

In order to ensure access to education and promote a safe and peaceful learning environment, in particular for female returnees and IDP children, UNHCR with support from the Netherlands, has built two school buildings. The latter consist of 16 classrooms, a solar powered water network and latrines for Daman Middle School. A total of 5,135 students, of which 2,329 are female and 2,806 are male, are accommodated in the school.

Shazia, 20, irons sheets of masks after being supported by UNHCR with a training in Nangarhar province of Afghanistan.
On 2 November 2020, Shazia, 20, irons sheets of masks after being supported by UNHCR with a training in Nangarhar province of Afghanistan. © UNHCR  
Total contributions in 2021 to date