Ethiopia

 

Operation: Opération: Ethiopia

Location

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Key Figures

2020 planning figures
100% of asylum-seekers and refugees will be biometrically registered using biometric identity management system
76% of primary school-aged refugee children enrolled in primary education
2.5mn IDPs will be provided with protection support 
15 Global Acute Malnutrition (GAM) levels will be brought down to under the minimum international standard of less than 15%
20 litres of potable water, on average, will be available per person per day
2018 year-end results
230,990 out of 905,830 refugees underwent Level 3 registration and 170,930 were enrolled in UNHCR’s BIMS
203,900 refugee children were enrolled in refugee schools across all camps - a gross enrollment rate of 50.7%
1,120 refugee children were integrated into host community schools
52% of newly arrived Eritrean unaccompanied and separated children were placed in family-based alternative care
13.49% The Global Acute Malnutrition (GAM) prevalence rate was reduced amongst the South Sudanese refugee population to 13.49% below the emergency threshold of 15% compared to 23.5% in 2017

People of Concern Personnes relevant de la compétence du HCR

79%
Increase in
2018
2018 3,521,647
2017 1,970,983
2016 794,133

 

[["Refugees",903226],["Asylum-seekers",2153],["IDPs",2615800],["Returned refugees",16],["Others of concern",452]]
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Ethiopia

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2018 {"categories":[2015,2016,2017,2018,2019,2020],"budget":[311.641954085,279.32741856,330.548038811,327.75467587,346.50985898,351.498680558],"expenditure":[152.1095677,135.61655247,144.92837149,156.75668159,null,null]} {"categories":[2015,2016,2017,2018,2019,2020],"p1":[311.641954085,279.32741856,330.548038811,311.12581387,310.80953683,316.219414182],"p2":[null,null,null,null,null,null],"p3":[null,null,null,null,7,7],"p4":[null,null,null,16.628862,28.70032215,28.279266376]} {"categories":[2015,2016,2017,2018,2019,2020],"p1":[152.1095677,135.61655247,144.92837149,146.27876899,null,null],"p2":[null,null,null,null,null,null],"p3":[null,null,null,null,null,null],"p4":[null,null,null,10.4779126,null,null]}
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  • 2020

Year-end Overview

Plan Overview

Working environment

The political and security environment in Ethiopia remains comparatively stable and should provide a conducive working environment for UNHCR and other humanitarian actors in 2020.    
 
Ethiopia has a long-standing history of hosting refugees and maintains an open-door policy for refugees seeking protection in its territory. One of the original signatories to the 1951 Convention relating to the Status of Refugees, Ethiopia recently updated its existing national refugee proclamation, making it one of the most progressive in Africa. The new law introduces several new provisions that will facilitate refugees’ enjoyment of rights afforded to other foreign nationals residing in the country.
 
Continued insecurity, caused by conflict or scarcity of natural resources in neighbouring countries, has prompted sustained refugee movements into Ethiopia. Eritreans, South Sudanese, Sudanese and Yemenis, as well as Somalis originating from South and Central Somalia, are recognized as prima facie refugees, while nationals of other countries undergo individual refugee status determination.
 
During the past decade, Ethiopia has also been affected by internal displacement, with an estimated population of about 2.5 million IDPs, which has resulted in UNHCR gradually increasing its operational presence and response.
 
Ethiopia has well-established refugee response and coordination processes in place, based on the Refugee Coordination Model and anchored in a solid framework of refugee law and procedure. The refugee response in Ethiopia unites 54 operational partners, including the Government’s Agency for Refugees and Returnees Affairs (ARRA), supported by UNHCR in coordination with UN agencies, as well as international and national NGOs. In addition, UNHCR engages in the interagency Refugee Coordination Group and in various sector working groups.
 

Key priorities

In 2020, UNHCR will provide protection and assistance to 751,400 refugees and asylum-seekers from Eritrea, Somalia, South Sudan and Sudan, in addition to other nationalities that reside in the urban areas. In addition, UNHCR helps provide protection and assistance to an estimated 2.5 million IDPs in Ethiopia.
 
A comprehensive protection and solutions strategy has been developed for registered refugees in the country. Under this strategy, UNHCR’s core common objectives in 2020 include: 
  • Preserving and enhancing the protection environment and living conditions for refugees, while promoting the peaceful coexistence of refugees and host communities;
  • Strengthening refugee protection by expanding improved community-based and multi-sectorial child protection and sexual and gender-based violence programmes and strengthening access to basic services.
  • Expanding labour opportunities and supporting implementation of the Government’s Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework pledges to expand refugees’ access to rights, services and self-reliance opportunities in the longer-term. This is in line with the Global Compact on Refugees;
  • Developing links to local and national development interventions and expanding access to solutions and legal migration pathways.
 
To respond to internal displacement, UNHCR will:
  • Expand protection monitoring to additional areas affected by internal displacement and areas of return.
  • Provide technical protection expertise to support development initiatives, creating conditions conducive to the sustainable reintegration of returning IDPs.
  • Expand and develop community-based, tailored approaches to IDPs’ protection needs.
  • Provide protection leadership within the UN Country Team’s Durable Solutions Working Group and the Federal IDP Durable Solution Working Group.
  • Advocate the ratification of the Kampala Convention and provide the Government with technical support to do so.
  • Distribute core relief items and carry out emergency shelter interventions to IDPs.
Latest contributions
  • 03-DEC-2019
    United States of America

    private donors

    $55,000
  • 02-DEC-2019
    Italy
    $5,637,475
  • European Union
    $5,500,551
  • 30-NOV-2019
    Malaysia

    private donors

    $192,585
  • Switzerland

    private donors

    $163,580
  • China

    private donors

    $941,588
  • Canada

    private donors

    $826,063
  • Netherlands

    private donors

    $179,168
  • Thailand

    private donors

    $579,403
  • Republic of Korea

    private donors

    $4,008,692
  • Italy

    private donors

    $1,771,974
  • France

    private donors

    $114,094
  • Mexico

    private donors

    $77,706
  • United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

    private donors

    $417,451
  • Philippines

    private donors

    $161,644
  • United Arab Emirates

    private donors

    $126,845
  • 29-NOV-2019
    Switzerland
    $1,008,064
  • Denmark
    $143,307
  • Germany
    $4,444,445
  • Brazil

    private donors

    $201,518