Jordan

 

Operation: Opération: Jordan

Location

{"longitude":36,"latitude":31,"zoom_level":7,"iso_codes":"'JOR'"}

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Key Figures

2021 planning figures
60,000 individuals will receive legal assistance 
38,700 households will receive monthly multipurpose cash assistance 
36,000 people of concern will be referred to secondary and tertiary medical care
5,900 refugee children will benefit from best interest determination
1,600 survivors of gender-based violence will receive psychological support
2019 year-end results
81,600  people of concern received legal advice or assistance, with 4,200 interventions by UNHCR related to detention
32,500  households received monthly cash grants
28,500  refugees were referred to secondary and tertiary health care, including obstetric emergencies.
6,800  best interests assessments were conducted for children-at-risk
1,700  survivors of sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) received psychosocial counselling

People of Concern Personnes relevant de la compétence du HCR

3%
Decrease in
2019
2019 747,116
2018 769,260
2017 734,841

 

[["Refugees",693684],["Asylum-seekers",51305],["Others of concern",2127]]
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Jordan

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2019 {"categories":[2016,2017,2018,2019,2020,2021],"budget":[318.80353781,277.212605641,274.89660650999997,371.91846122000004,426.73744859,405.00744897000004],"expenditure":[218.32880034000002,238.50705437,224.59320141999999,213.88049035,null,null]} {"categories":[2016,2017,2018,2019,2020,2021],"p1":[318.80353781,277.212605641,274.89660650999997,371.91846122000004,426.73744859,405.00744897000004],"p2":[null,null,null,null,null,null],"p3":[null,null,null,null,null,null],"p4":[null,null,null,null,null,null]} {"categories":[2016,2017,2018,2019,2020,2021],"p1":[218.32880034000002,238.50705437,224.59320141999999,213.88049035,null,null],"p2":[null,null,null,null,null,null],"p3":[null,null,null,null,null,null],"p4":[null,null,null,null,null,null]}
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Year-end Overview

Operational environment

While Jordan is not a signatory to the 1951 Convention relating to the Status of Refugees, a memorandum of understanding signed in 1998 sets the parameters for cooperation between UNHCR and the Government on the issues pertaining to refugees and asylum-seekers. In fact, the Government has long welcomed refugees from neighbouring countries. It works closely with UNHCR and partners to improve and expand refugees’ access to services and, most importantly, integrate refugees in national systems such as for health and education. This has become all the more important given theCOVID-19 pandemic.
 
Jordan was facing record unemployment and slow economic growth before the pandemic. Yet, due to the pandemic-induced economic downturn, the livelihoods of both refugees and host communities have significantly deteriorated. Efforts are being made to assist refugees in the face of increasing destitution. Against this backdrop, in 2021, the Government will continue to lead the Jordan Response Plan (JRP) and, together with UNHCR, support refugees in need.
 
In 2021, UNHCR’s assistance to people of concern will focus on protection, cash assistance, livelihoods, health care, camp management and community mobilization, with an emphasis on vulnerability-based targeting. UNHCR’s multipurpose cash assistance strategy will be a central component of the comprehensive protection response for those living in urban areas. UNHCR will reinforce its partnerships with national actors, while enhancing comprehensive community-based protection interventions, including through mobile helpdesks, mobile registration and communication groups.
 
In 2021, UNHCR will also continue to advocate the inclusivity of the JRP in line with the Syria Regional Refugee and Resilience Plan (3RP) and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. To enhance the livelihoods of both refugees and host communities, collaboration with development actors and private investors will be further pursued.

Key priorities

In 2021, UNHCR will focus on:
  • Advocating access to territory, the right to seek asylum, the principles of non-refoulement, family unity, and the provision of security and protection for people of concern, in accordance with international refugee protection principles.
  • Advocating the inclusion of refugees in national social protection systems, so they can access social security benefits including, but not limited to, healthcare through referrals and the unemployment fund for those working both in the formal and informal sectors.
  • Providing multi-sectoral assistance to refugees in camps; coordinating multi-purpose cash assistance for the most vulnerable and supporting the graduation model, which allows the discontinuation of cash in conjunction with more livelihoods’ opportunities.
Latest contributions
  • 16-APR-2021
    Italy
    $586,167
  • 14-APR-2021
    Republic of Korea
    $4,000,000
  • 12-APR-2021
    Japan
    $32,543,949
  • 09-APR-2021
    Republic of Korea
    $1,000,000
  • Lithuania
    $58,617
  • 06-APR-2021
    Japan

    private donors

    $101,742
  • 05-APR-2021
    Finland
    $8,206,331
  • 04-APR-2021
    Qatar

    private donors

    $993,553
  • United Arab Emirates

    private donors

    $141,654
  • United States of America

    private donors

    $649,161
  • 31-MAR-2021
    Switzerland

    private donors

    $130,294
  • Germany

    private donors

    $4,838,709
  • United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

    private donors

    $305,378
  • Spain

    private donors

    $9,357,342
  • 30-MAR-2021
    Malaysia

    private donors

    $336,225
  • Greece

    private donors

    $134,128
  • France
    $1,151,802
  • Thailand

    private donors

    $501,976
  • Republic of Korea

    private donors

    $8,056,152
  • Netherlands

    private donors

    $343,918