Syrian Arab Republic

 

Operation: Opération: Syrian Arab Republic

Location

{"longitude":39,"latitude":35,"zoom_level":0,"iso_codes":"'SYR'"}

By clicking on the icons on the map, additional information is displayed.
The boundaries and names shown and the designations used on this map do not imply official endorsement or acceptance by the United Nations.

 

Key Figures

2021 planning figures
600,000 people of concern will receive legal assistance
420,000 households will receive core relief items
70,700 households will receive shelter support
20,000 people of concern will receive psychosocial support
20,000 at-risk children will benefit from tailored support services
2019 year-end results
1.8 million  people were assisted with core relied items
1.7 million people benefitted from protection activities
520,900  people were supported with emergency and long-term shelter assistance
427,600  people accessed health care services
311,700  IDPs and returnees received counselling, information and legal aid through a network of more than 200 lawyers and 100 outreach volunteers
101,200  children were enrolled in accelerated education programmes
93,500  people with specific needs received psychosocial support
17,600  individuals were assisted with livelihood support

People of Concern Personnes relevant de la compétence du HCR

5%
Increase in
2019
2019 6,938,584
2018 6,600,217
2017 7,033,119

 

[["Refugees",16213],["Asylum-seekers",12069],["IDPs",6146994],["Returned IDPs",477360],["Returned refugees",94977],["Stateless",160000],["Others of concern",30971]]
Loading ...

Syrian Arab Republic

< Back
2019 {"categories":[2016,2017,2018,2019,2020,2021],"budget":[315.69039415,497.600068126,612.18900001,624.38269265,575.58593913,612.3826931500001],"expenditure":[137.49994288,159.72845298000001,186.69789025,176.13223937,null,null]} {"categories":[2016,2017,2018,2019,2020,2021],"p1":[52.75013228,47.39999955,47.246065789999996,46.968149090000004,47.91403503,46.96814903],"p2":[0.1946423,0.21116958,0.19864073000000002,0.198641,0.19864019,0.19864019],"p3":[null,146,259.2,259.38285378,317.83304869,317.83304869],"p4":[262.74561957,303.988898996,305.54429349000003,317.83304877999996,209.64021522,247.38285524]} {"categories":[2016,2017,2018,2019,2020,2021],"p1":[23.57270191,16.49820621,14.802303779999999,13.57418511,null,null],"p2":[0.10932031,0.007318,0.00788707,0.027757990000000003,null,null],"p3":[null,4.841297559999999,29.36963591,17.18097997,null,null],"p4":[113.81792066,138.38163121,142.51806349,145.3493163,null,null]}
Loading ...

CHOOSE A YEAR
  • 2014
  • 2015
  • 2016
  • 2017
  • 2018
  • 2019
  • 2020
  • 2021

Year-end Overview

Plan Overview

Operational environment

According to the 2020 Humanitarian Needs Overview, more than 11 million people in Syria are in need of humanitarian assistance, including some 4.65 million who are in acute need due to a convergence of vulnerabilities.
 
The humanitarian needs of Syrians will remain extensive in 2021, with significant protection risks due to continuous hostilities in localized areas, new and protracted displacements, ongoing spontaneous returns of internally displaced people and refugees, and the erosion of communities’ resilience without enhanced international support.
 
The overall protection situation will be characterized by the risks outlined above interlinked with needs arising from loss of livelihoods, housing, property and living in sub-standard conditions.
 
Compounded by the COVID-19 pandemic, the socio-economic impact of the protracted crisis has led to diminished capacity of communities to mitigate protection risks. As a result of the economic crisis, dependency  on humanitarian assistance is deepening and there is increasing resort to harmful coping strategies. The pandemic also affected resettlement, refugee status determination and registration, with a resulting significant backlog of the cases to be carried over to 2021.
 
Syria is not a signatory to the 1951 Convention relating to the Status of Refugees or the 1967 Protocol. However, the Government has largely provided access to territory, reception arrangements, and asylum for those in need.
 
In 2021, UNHCR will maintain relations with the High Relief Committee and other  relevant government entitles to ensure that people of concern are integrated into national planning processes. UNHCR will also continue seeking support and advice from national NGOs with local knowledge and networks in local communities.
 
UNHCR will continue to ensure that the rights of refugees, returnees and IDPs are fully reflected in the work of inter-agency coordination mechanisms. It will also lead the Whole of Syria protection, shelter and non-food items sectors and be active in both regional and national responses. 
 
UNHCR will maintain strategic partnerships with sister UN agencies and other humanitarian actors, including through the Return and Reintegration Working Group, to analyze and assess needs enabling smooth reintegration of returnees, building resilience, facilitating access to services, and inclusion of persons of concern into national plans.
 
The ability of UNHCR to monitor implementation will continue to be affected by COVID-19-related restrictions. In 2021, Given these restrictions, mitigating measures that UNHCR will take include:
(i) providing remote capacity building to partners facing challenges related to internet connection, electricity power cuts, and online learning;
(ii) continuing the use of third party monitors; and
(iii) improving UNHCR remote monitoring.

Key priorities:

In 2021, aligned with UNHCR’s Strategic Directions (2017-2021) and the Humanitarian Response Plan, UNHCR will continue to pursue a needs-based approach, with a particular focus on enhancing resilience and access to solutions for refugees and internally displaced people.
 
UNHCR Syria has set four main strategic directions for 2021:
 
1- Emergency preparedness and response
UNHCR will continue to co-lead the protection, shelter and non-food items sectors. In addition, UNHCR will maintain a sizable stock to cover the emergency needs, such as transitional shelters and core relief items, of over 400,000 households in Syria. This will include assistance provided in the inter-agency COVID-19 response.
 
2- IDP and refugee return/reintegration
UNHCR will provide a sequenced, multi-sectoral return support package to communities where spontaneous returns of IDPs and/or refugees are taking place, to support access to protection and basic services, build community resilience and help ensure the viability of returns, coordinating with UN and NGO partners for short and mid-term interventions, and engaging with relevant government entities to address obstacles to return and enhance returnee reintegration.
 
3- Protection and innovative solutions for refugees
The most vulnerable refugees will continue to have access to existing services and assistance, including case management, MHPSS, legal and education support (non-formal education and tertiary scholarships), in-kind, cash and winterization assistance. A strategic use of refugee status determination and resettlement will go hand-in-hand with a review of registration procedures. The roll-out of proGres v4, UNHCR’s registration and case management system and postponed twice in 2020, remains a priority for 2021.
 
4- Delivery-focused partnerships
Under the draft UN Strategic Framework for 2021–2023, UNHCR will co-lead the pillars relating to returns and to enhancing resilience.  UNHCR will engage with multiple partners and stakeholders to maximize the impact of its interventions and to inform and enhance the engagement of partners in affected communities, especially in locations where spontaneous returns are taking place.
Latest contributions
  • 31-DEC-2020
    Canada

    private donors

    $375,385
  • Kenya

    private donors

    $57,742
  • Switzerland

    private donors

    $256,072
  • Spain
    $389,372
  • Greece

    private donors

    $50,315
  • Philippines
    $100,000
  • Italy

    private donors

    $63,281
  • Spain

    private donors

    $13,190,185
  • 30-DEC-2020
    Malaysia

    private donors

    $303,038
  • Greece

    private donors

    $107,219
  • Netherlands

    private donors

    $431,558
  • Sweden

    private donors

    $4,401,924
  • United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

    private donors

    $968,523
  • Mexico

    private donors

    $86,167
  • Thailand

    private donors

    $529,395
  • Philippines

    private donors

    $201,488
  • France

    private donors

    $338,279
  • United Arab Emirates

    private donors

    $127,170
  • Singapore

    private donors

    $53,894
  • China

    private donors

    $907,847