Registration and profiling

Registration and profiling

Problem Assessment, Comprehensive and Prioritised Response

Entry regulations introduced in early 2015 has restricted the ability of Syrians to enter the country and seek protection. The Government’s instruction to UNHCR to suspend new registrations of Syrians, as of the beginning of 2015, remains in effect. The only exception is that babies born in Lebanon to Syrian parents registered with UNHCR can be registered in the file of their parents, through a joint procedure by UNHCR and MOSA. It is projected that some 29,000 new-born babies will be registered in 2019.

Syrians who have approached UNHCR since this instruction have been provided with information on the suspension and received counselling on the protection and assistance situation for Syrians in Lebanon. Information about their needs and vulnerabilities is also being gathered, in order to ensure that they are included in relevant assistance programmes.

UNHCR continues to verify the registered refugee population on a regular basis, and update data on the refugee population based on information received through its outreach activities, the call centre, counselling sessions and other contacts with refugees. Approximately 74% of the registered population had their data verified and updated throughout 2017. As part of the prioritized response, continuous registration will ensure that UNHCR has updated qualitative and quantitative information reflecting the population profile and needs which serves a basis for response and programme design for UNHCR and its partners. The registration certificate renewal process will remain the primary mechanism to implement continuous registration. Continuous registration is of particular importance also in view of the merged RSD/resettlement processing. Mobile registration missions will be maintained to reach refugees who are unable to approach UNHCR. Some 153,400 families (representing around 646,600 individuals) will be due to renew their certificates in 2019.  Through its reception activities, in 2019 UNHCR aims at updating the registration data of 69% of the total registered Syrian population.

As of mid-2018, 976,065 refugees from Syria were registered with UNHCR, representing a decrease of 25,049 compared to mid-2017.  As this does not represent the total number of Syrians in need of international protection in Lebanon, UNHCR continues to advocate for the resumption of registration, in order to enable the Agency, donors and partners to plan and budget for the real needs, and UNHCR to work towards finding durable solutions for all, in the form of third country resettlement and voluntary repatriation in safety and dignity. If registration is resumed, then UNHCR will need to temporarily upscale its registration capacity.

UNHCR will continue its use of biometrics during 2019, to ensure the integrity of the systems in place and to facilitate the delivery of assistance by UNHCR and other humanitarian organisations. Fraud prevention is a priority, and is incorporated in the Registration Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs); also, all interview and counselling rooms are equipped with audiovisual cameras. Anti-fraud information is included in all leaflets and posters clearly indicating that all services provided by UNHCR are free. All staff have received training on Prevention of Sexual Exploitation and Abuse (PSEA) Leaflets explaining the complaint mechanism to persons of concern are placed next to the complaint boxes in all reception centres.

In 2019, UNHCR Lebanon will continue the process of digitizing the files with documents that refugees have shared with UNHCR over the years.
 
A solid staffing capacity needs to be maintained to allow for such detailed and enhanced processing, while maintaining minimum waiting periods.

Results and Impact

As of December 2019, the number of Syrians registered with UNHCR stood at 910,586 individuals, representing a drop of 34,201 from December 2018. The suspension of registration of new Syrian arrivals since 2015 continued throughout 2019. Through reception centres and outreach mobile missions, UNHCR continued to provide counselling interviews to refugees who approached/contacted UNHCR reception centres with the intention of registering. The purpose of the counselling interview was to inform new Syrian arrivals about the Lebanese Government’s decision from 2015 to suspend registration and to assess and document their vulnerabilities.

Document renewal and verification interviews of registered Syrian refugees continued. During 2019, 681,474 individuals had their personal data verified and updated, representing 72 per cent of the population registered at the beginning of the year. New certificates were issued to 433,106 individuals, while 62,714 individuals were inactivated or closed due to deaths, resettlement departures or returns to Syria.

In coordination with MoSA, UNHCR maintained the registration of newborn babies from a registered Syrian parent who were born in Lebanon. A total of 28,513 newborn babies were registered in 2019.
Impact Indicator Baseline Year-End Target
% of persons of concern registered on an individual basis 84.3 100 100
Output Performance Indicator Year-End Target
Registration data updated on a continuous basis % of registration data updated during the last year 72.0 75
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