Basic and domestic and hygiene Items

Basic and domestic and hygiene Items

Population has sufficient basic and domestic items

Without legal residence and work permits, most refugees and asylum-seekers do not have access to legal employment and incomes to support their families. Lack of work permits remains a major obstacle that hinders any significant improvement in the livelihoods for people of concern in Jordan.

UNHCR’s cash assistance therefore represents a major financial resource for Iraqis and non-Iraqis refugees and asylum seekers. People with specific needs (the elderly, disabled, women at risk, large families) rely heavily on the international humanitarian aid and charities to access basic domestic items; however UNHCR is not in position to fully cover the daily needs of the most vulnerable.

UNHCR may not manage to procure and distribute sanitary napkins for women of reproductive age through outlets managed by partners.

Population has sufficient basic and domestic items

UNHCR assisted over 2,400 cases (approximately 12,000 individuals) with regular monthly cash assistance in 2015. Winterization support was also provided for the same population in addition to the full Sudanese caseload in Jordan. As the needs of this population continue to grow, UNHCR's ability to address their basic needs remains limited. The amount of cash provided to the non-Syrian caseload is higher than that of Syrians as the avenues for support for this caseload is significantly less than what is available for Syrians. However, of those that received regular cash, some 53 per cent were lifted out of poverty as a result of UNHCR's intervention.

Impact Indicator Baseline Year-End Target
% of targeted households whose basic needs are met with multi-purpose cash grants or vouchers 38 48 83
Output Performance Indicator Year-End Target
Cash grants or vouchers (multi-purpose) provided # of households receiving cash grants 2,400 5,000
Seasonal and complementary items provided # of households receiving seasonal support 501 6,805
Cash grants or vouchers (multi-purpose) provided # of households receiving vouchers 715 1,800
Sanitary materials provided # of women receiving sanitary materials 2,400 1,200

Population has sufficient basic and domestic items

Problem Assessment and Comprehensive Response

Syrian refugees living outside refugees camps in Jordan have very limited sources of income. Some are engaged in agricultural work and other types of seasonal employment, and a few have found jobs in the retail or service industries in local markets; however, most are unable to cover food, accommodation, water, electricity, gas and heating costs. People with specific needs such as women-at-risk, unaccompanied older persons, and persons with serious medical conditions are particularly affected by this situation.

As a result, Syrian refugees are increasingly relying upon food and material assistance provided by local communities, community-based organizations (CBOs), and other humanitarian organizations. In refugee camps, CBOs, NGOs and private donors are also providing in-kind assistance to refugees in the form of non-food item packages.

Even though the camp-based refugee population is expected to grow, the Office anticipates being able to cover 100 per cent of their basic needs. In urban areas however, coverage of basic needs is much more challenging. Strong coordination and leadership is required in such contexts.

In order to address these challenges, UNHCR will continue providing unconditional cash assistance to extremely vulnerable people of concern. As in previous years, cash-based assistance will target the most needy and vulnerable families in the urban areas. Winterisation supplements and other cash-based assistance will also be distributed. In addition sanitary materials will be distributed to all women of reproductive age residing in refugee camps. Hygiene kits as well as basic items such as mattresses, blankets and kitchen sets will be provided to newly arriving refugees. 

Population has sufficient basic and domestic items

By the end of 2015, UNHCR in Jordan provided cash assistance to a total of 30,000 Syrian refugee households (approximately 140,000 people) in urban areas, which represents an increase of some 7,500 families compared to the start of the year. In addition to increasing the number of households reached, the cash scale was also revised during the year and as a result, cash assistance met 83 per cent of the required level of basic households needs when measured against the 2015 minimum expenditure basket, which remained consistent with the notion of a cash complement applied in previous years. Measured against the Vulnerability Assessment Framework and Welfare Model, UNHCR assistance helped lift over 43 per cent of the beneficiaries out of poverty. In the absence of broad access to gainful employment, cash assistance remained the key live-saving intervention for urban refugees in Jordan. Post-distribution monitoring exercises were conducted on a quarterly basis to obtain feedback from refugees on the impact of UNHCR cash interventions. Of those surveyed, some 96 per cent stated that cash assistance helped their situation and some 91 per cent of respondents stated cash assistance improved their living conditions either significantly (43 per cent) or moderately (49 per cent). Beneficiaries obtained the cash through ATMs at the Cairo-Amman Bank that are equipped with iris scanning technology thereby eliminating the potential for fraud.

UNHCR, through its partner Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC), provided CRIs (e.g. blankets, sleeping mats, plastic sheets, kitchen sets, jerry cans, and buckets) to over 9,710 households in camps in 2015. UNHCR also supported NRC in managing replenishment sites in Zaatari and Azraq camps, thereby minimizing the need for other actors to keep distribution staff on standby for extended periods of time. Through this mechanism, over 787,000 items were distributed to camp residents over the course of the year. In order to support Zaatari residents obtain hygiene items, unconditional vouchers were provided throughout the year to the whole camp population.

In addition, UNHCR enhanced its winterization programming in 2015 and reached over 200,000 vulnerable Syrians through this programme. Winterization cash was provided to a total of 31,137 Syrian refugee families, of which some 8,564 received a full package (JOD 73 / USD 103 per person), while some 22,623 families received a half package (JOD 48 / USD 68). The amount per package was set based on the costs associated with purchasing needed winter items (blankets, gas, etc.), with full packages going to families who had not yet received winterization support and half packages benefitting people who previously received winterization cash. Zaatari residents received unconditional vouchers to purchase gas refills as well as a one-off cash distribution (JOD 20 / USD 28) to cover their other winter needs. Refugees living in Azraq also benefited from UNHCR’s winterization interventions. Some 1,494 new arrivals received heaters, while over 13,310 gas refills and 3,000 gas cylinders were provided to the benefit of the entire Azraq population. In addition, a total of 16,830 unconditional vouchers were also provided (JOD 10 / USD 14) to assist Azraq residents purchase items needed for the winter.

Impact Indicator Baseline Year-End Target
% of households whose needs for basic and domestic items are met 20 22 22
% of targeted households whose basic needs are met with multi-purpose cash grants or vouchers 18 24.4 20
% of women with sanitary supplies 86 19.5 88
Output Performance Indicator Year-End Target
Cash grants or vouchers (multi-purpose) provided # of households receiving cash grants 30,000 30,000
Seasonal and complementary items provided # of households receiving complementary items 3,063 26,000
Core relief items provided # of households receiving core relief items 33,139 24,000
Seasonal and complementary items provided # of households receiving seasonal support 51,073 30,000
Cash grants or vouchers (multi-purpose) provided # of households receiving vouchers 885 4,500
Core relief items provided # of persons receiving hygienic supplies 71,241 200,000
Sanitary materials provided # of women receiving sanitary materials 40,952 30,000
Latest contributions
  • 11-OCT-2019
    European Union
    $109,410
  • Netherlands
    $2,352,940
  • Liechtenstein
    $403,227
  • 10-OCT-2019
    Germany
    $116,073
  • 07-OCT-2019
    United States of America

    private donors

    $281,359
  • 03-OCT-2019
    United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
    $12,931,034
  • 02-OCT-2019
    Denmark
    $3,663,004
  • Germany
    $2,188,184
  • 30-SEP-2019
    Malaysia

    private donors

    $163,071
  • United States of America

    private donors

    $295,000
  • Netherlands

    private donors

    $137,178
  • France

    private donors

    $92,258
  • Mexico

    private donors

    $60,259
  • Italy

    private donors

    $1,594,953
  • Spain

    private donors

    $6,715,150
  • Kuwait
    $12,000,000
  • Denmark
    $16,202,681
  • Philippines

    private donors

    $139,349
  • United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

    private donors

    $173,377
  • Republic of Korea

    private donors

    $3,843,047