Eastern Europe

Operational information on the Eastern Europe subregion is presented below. A summary of this can also be downloaded in PDF format. This subregion covers the following countries:
 

| Armenia | Azerbaijan | Belarus | Georgia | Russian Federation | Turkey | Ukraine

Subregion: Eastern Europe

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Budgets and Expenditure in Subregion Eastern Europe

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2017 {"categories":[2014,2015,2016,2017,2018,2019],"budget":[373.29339842,420.086669828,423.24577262,429.650058418,491.51228885,452.22872214],"expenditure":[129.57658867,127.2709373,168.29172532,186.91989969,null,null]} {"categories":[2014,2015,2016,2017,2018,2019],"p1":[348.65309119,370.486506469,379.8935932,392.981355428,459.99920613,423.2511281],"p2":[3.22419003,2.750744475,2.21052703,2.11277392,2.29926579,2.48492599],"p3":[null,null,null,null,null,null],"p4":[21.4161172,46.849418884,41.14165239,34.55592907,29.21381693,26.49266805]} {"categories":[2014,2015,2016,2017,2018,2019],"p1":[114.93678843,98.15642826,144.86997663,166.23009045,null,null],"p2":[1.28411391,1.14276108,1.01061833,1.44116086,null,null],"p3":[null,null,null,null,null,null],"p4":[13.35568633,27.97174796,22.41113036,19.24864838,null,null]}
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People of Concern - 2019 [projected]

[["Refugees",3553750],["Asylum-seekers",353430],["IDPs",2290197],["Returned IDPs",100000],["Stateless",108705]]
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Operational Environment

Eastern Europe continues to host a significant number of people of concern to UNHCR, including refugees, IDPs, persons in refugee-like situation and stateless persons. UNHCR works to ensure that all people of concern receive protection, live in safety and dignity together with host communities, and progressively attain lasting solutions.
 
UNHCR will engage in strengthening the asylum system to ensure sustainability of its efforts, and will support and encourage the Governments to adjust their capacity putting more efforts into local integration programmes. In this regard, UNHCR will promote strategic partnerships with development actors by advocating for refugees’ needs to be mainstreamed in the national Sustainable Development Goals programmes as well as into national strategies.
 
The conflicts in Afghanistan, Iraq, the Syrian Arab Republic and Ukraine continue to impact the sub-region. UNHCR closely monitors the situation of internally displaced Ukrainians and while is it believed that since 2014 over a million Ukrainian left the country, as of 1 July 2018, 151,000 Ukrainians are still in need of international protection in neighboring and other countries.  
 
Unresolved conflicts in the region hinder the resolution of displacement challenges. While the basic needs of the displaced are gradually being met, many people of concern have been in a precarious situation for years and are still in need of durable solutions.
 
In 2019, UNHCR’s work in Eastern Europe will focus on:
 
  • Strengthening the quality of the national asylum systems, including refugee status determination, to ensure that people of concern to UNHCR have access to protection;
  • Supporting access to durable solutions for refugees, primarily through local integration and self-reliance activities;
  • Supporting peacebuilding initiatives in an effort to improve conditions for durable solutions and prevention of further displacement;
  • Regular monitoring of conditions in reception and temporary accommodation centres, borders, and penitentiary establishments;
  • Strengthening national legislation and procedures to prevent and reduce statelessness, and advocating accession to the two statelessness conventions;
  • Supporting government actions for and accountabilities to all people of concern, including IDPs;
  • Assisting people of concern with specific needs, while working to facilitate access to public services and livelihoods for all people of concern;
  • Work closely with relevant stakeholders on contingency planning, as required.
 
The overall strategy is to gradually move the focus of UNHCR’s work from direct assistance to advocacy, thus, some cash assistance will target the most vulnerable to cover acute shelter, winterization, medical, child protection, SGBV response and other specific needs. Legal aid, as well as some ad-hoc health care interventions will be provided.

Response and Implementation

The operations in the Russian Federation and Ukraine are presented in separate country chapters.
 
Armenia has been impacted by the arrival of Syrian refugees in recent years, and some 14,700 Syrian nationals of Armenian origin remained in the country as of 1 July 2018, in addition to some 3,300 refugees from various countries. The most vulnerable refugees will continue to benefit from support provided by UNHCR, in cooperation with the Government and NGOs, including in terms of accommodation and livelihoods. UNHCR will continue work to further strengthen the asylum procedure and improving reception conditions; pursue engagement with the law enforcement agencies to have a differentiated approach and reduce detention of asylum-seekers, and maintain coordination with partners to maximize resources and strengthen advocacy.
 
Azerbaijan, as of 1 July 2018, hosted some 1,115 refugees, 172 asylum-seekers and some 3,600 stateless persons, and over 612,000 IDPs. UNHCR will continue its support to the government in improving the quality of its RSD procedures and introducing and operationalizing complementary forms of protection which will hopefully result in the Government recognizing larger numbers of refugees and providing greater access to rights and services, notably the right to decent employment. As of 2017, the Government took over from UNHCR provision of primary health-care to refugees and asylum-seekers, while UNHCR will continue supporting vulnerable cases to access secondary health care. In a coalition with the Government, UN agencies and other stakeholders, UNHCR will work on SGBV prevention and response and providing legal assistance to IDPs communities.
 
In Belarus, UNHCR will continue its focus on supporting the Government in building an efficient and effective national asylum system, and will promote local integration and self-reliance as the most viable durable solutions for refugees in the country. As of 1 July 2018, there were 8,000 person of concern to UNHCR in Belarus, including some 5,780 stateless persons, some 2,677 refugee and 178 asylum-seekers awaiting decisions on their applications. This is in addition to some 170,000 Ukrainians who arrived since 2014 due to ongoing conflict. UNHCR is advocating Belarus’ accession to the UN Statelessness Conventions. Finally, in partnership with IOM and other UN agencies, UNHCR will support Belarus in addressing the increasing mixed movements.
 
In Georgia, UNHCR will support efforts by relevant stakeholders to protect and improve conditions for the integration of refugees and other displaced populations. As of 1 July 2018, some 2,000 refugees and people in refugee-like situations, some 500 asylum-seekers, some 600 stateless persons and some 280,000 IDPs were present in Georgia. UNHCR will seek to ensure that people of concern are informed of their rights, improve access to State services and expand ongoing socio-economic support based on a combination of self-reliance and employment opportunities, as well a support the most vulnerable people with cash-based interventions. UNHCR will carry out monitoring of access to territory and to the asylum procedure, as well as reception conditions, and will further strengthen the quality of national asylum procedures notably by advocating for the full and inclusive application of refugee law principles. In Abkhazia, UNHCR will continue advocating for freedom of movement, documentation and full access to all rights for the IDP returnee population as well as persons in a refugee-like situation, while also supporting the provision of sustainable livelihood opportunities for these populations.

2019 Budget for Eastern Europe | USD

Operation Pillar 1
Refugee programme
Pillar 2
Stateless programme
Pillar 3
Reintegration projects
Pillar 4
IDP projects
Total
Belarus 1,907,75446,212001,953,966
Regional Office in the South Caucasus 11,026,740647,65604,277,54515,951,940
Russian Federation 5,585,930875,275006,461,205
Turkey 399,574,2585,00000399,579,258
Ukraine 5,156,445910,783022,215,12328,282,352
Total 423,251,1282,484,926026,492,668452,228,722

2019 Voluntary Contributions to Eastern Europe | USD

Earmarking / Donor Pillar 1
Refugee programme
Pillar 4
IDP projects
All
pillars
Total
Belarus
International Organization for Migration 87,73900 87,739
Belarus subtotal 87,73900 87,739
Turkey
European Union 38,392,46600 38,392,466
Japan 002,678,571 2,678,571
Private donors in Germany 0033,525 33,525
Turkey subtotal 38,392,46602,712,096 41,104,562
Ukraine
Japan 0839,2850 839,285
Lithuania 0034,130 34,130
Private donors in Germany 034,4430 34,443
Russian Federation 0250,0000 250,000
Sweden 0549,9950 549,995
Ukraine subtotal 01,673,72334,130 1,707,852
Total 38,480,2061,673,7232,746,225 42,900,154
Note: