Shelter and infrastructure

Shelter and infrastructure

Shelter and infrastructure established, improved and maintained

Problem Assessment and Comprehensive Response

The Government of Jordan (GoJ) intends to house approximately 200,000 refugees in Zaatari and Azraq; however further assistance will be required from humanitarian agencies if the camp is to reach its full capacity - between 100,000 - 110,000 individuals.

In Azraq camp, an estimated 10,000 additional T-shelters need to be built, and rehabilitation of existing infrastructure needs to be undertaken. In Zaatari, old shelters need to be upgraded, individual shelters expanded, and 10,000 emergency shelters installed.

In addition, UNHCR will provide upgrades to sub-standard accommodation in urban areas. Furthermore, in order to facilitate refugee access from the border areas to reception areas, the Office will invest in road construction and infrastructure maintenance projects. 

Shelter and infrastructure established, improved and maintained

UNHCR continued to serve as one of the main sector leads for shelter in 2015 and conducted maintenance and upgrades to shelters in both camp and urban settings during the year, through its partners NRC (in camps) and JHAS (in urban areas). A total of 1,000 families living in urban settings benefitted from shelter upgrades to ensure improved insulation and the conditions of their sub-standard shelters. This not only enhanced their standard of living but also ensured shelters were adequately insulated in time for winter. Shelter upgrades also took place in Azraq Camp with the installation of concrete flooring in over 3,125 shelters in the camp (flooring for the remaining shelters took place in 2014) and the introduction of shading over the main entrance to shelters (a total of 862 were completed in 2015). In addition, NRC also deployed quick fix teams which conducted basic repairs to over 4,315 shelters in the camp. These proved to be extremely beneficial in early 2015 following the winter storms that resulted in considerable damage to shelters in the camp.

Maintenance of the base camp and camp infrastructure in both Zaatari and Azraq was also ensured during the reporting period with some 2,040 repairs conducted. Maintenance teams utilized skilled refugee labour to undertake works whenever possible. Infrastructural upgrades primarily focused on repairing damaged roads (backfilling potholes, laying the base coarse, etc.) and fixing damages resulting from rain (cleaning and upgrading trenches, backfilling and levelling flood prone areas, etc.). In addition, a restructuring and addressing exercise commenced in Zaatari in 2015 which resulted in the relocation of over 2,900 caravans and new addresses for some 9,194 households. The restructuring exercise is still on-going and is expected to be completed in March 2016.
Impact Indicator Baseline Year-End Target
% of households living in adequate dwellings 100 80 100
Output Performance Indicator Year-End Target
General site operations constructed and sustained # of buildings/ structures constructed 9,257 13,000
Latest contributions
  • 11-OCT-2019
    European Union
    $109,410
  • Netherlands
    $2,352,940
  • Liechtenstein
    $403,227
  • 10-OCT-2019
    Germany
    $116,073
  • 07-OCT-2019
    United States of America

    private donors

    $281,359
  • 03-OCT-2019
    United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
    $12,931,034
  • 02-OCT-2019
    Denmark
    $3,663,004
  • Germany
    $2,188,184
  • 30-SEP-2019
    Malaysia

    private donors

    $163,071
  • United States of America

    private donors

    $295,000
  • Netherlands

    private donors

    $137,178
  • France

    private donors

    $92,258
  • Mexico

    private donors

    $60,259
  • Italy

    private donors

    $1,594,953
  • Spain

    private donors

    $6,715,150
  • Kuwait
    $12,000,000
  • Denmark
    $16,202,681
  • Philippines

    private donors

    $139,349
  • United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

    private donors

    $173,377
  • Republic of Korea

    private donors

    $3,843,047